The Puzzle

  The world in which we live can be a strange and incoherent puzzle.


    For those that take more than a passing interest in world affairs we have before us an array of pieces. We see the problems of poverty and social unrest and we lament the damage that we are doing to nature. We struggle to come to grips with how to assimilate advances in technology and the unemployment problem which it promises to make increasingly acute. We are constantly being squeezed by rising costs of living, taxation and inflation and of course we wonder why everybody is in debt. We see the vast capacity of industry, shops full with products they can’t sell and we hear the incessant drone of the advertiser.

    Our physical and mental health is suffering. Our families are under strain. Many of us are isolated from the communities where we live.

    We get no answers from leadership. Politics makes no sense and our economic advice comes from banks of various stripes who are obviously concerned with lining their own pockets at our expense. On top of all this there is an overarching move toward what Clifford Hugh Douglas described as the ‘development of world dominion': the centralisation of power.

    We can see the picture this puzzle will make when put together is pretty bleak. Many of us have decided to give up on assembling it at all, having resigned ourselves to the idea that the world doesn’t make sense and thinking ‘what can I do about it anyway?’ Others focus all of their attention on just one piece, but the world does fit together and there is no lasting improvement that will come from addressing symptoms only.

   A  careful study of Douglas’ ideas, otherwise known as Social Credit, will do a few things for you. It will suggest a new configuration and provide some sorely needed pieces you have been encouraged to ignore. Then once you have things in the right place you'll see that his remedy of providing economic security directly to the individual would neutralise the effects of irresponsible power by allowing each of us the freedom to better mind our own business.

    For those of you who give this a look I have this advice. When you do a big puzzle, and this is a big one, you get every piece face up and in its own space. You get the edges together, group the like colours and patterns and so on. But to do all this organising you need space.

    To figure this through you will need space also; mental space. It is the prejudices and preconceptions instilled over a lifetime of conditioning that are the biggest hindrance to the proper comprehension of the tangle we find ourselves in. Some of these include the belief in the crooked nature of man, Malthusian notions of economic scarcity, the neutral role of money, faith in partisan expertise, an unwillingness to face the role of conspiracy in modern history, the false paradigm of left right politics, puritanical attitudes about work and the fear of leisure. It is important to understand that these positions are not matters of fact. For many these notions are ideological templates that decide the acceptability of new information. They are Power’s attempt to superimpose a world they can control over the real world, and so long as we accept these precepts we will be unable to see the world as it is and the solutions to our problems will remain out of reach.

    Chomsky writes in Necessary Illusions, Thought Control in Democratic Societies -

   In the advanced industrial societies the problem is typically approached by a variety of measures to deprive democratic political structures of substantive content, while leaving them formally intact. A large part of this task is assumed by ideological institutions that channel thought and attitudes within acceptable bounds, deflecting any potential challenge to established privilege and authority before it can take form and gather strength.

    Likewise, the role of thought control as a means of maintaining power was not lost on Douglas when he wrote Economic Democracy in 1920 -

   We are, therefore, faced with an apparent dilemma, a world-wide movement towards centralised control, backed by strong arguments as to the increased efficiency and consequent economic necessity of organisation of this character, and, on the other hand, a deepening distrust of such measures bred by personal experience and observation of their effect on the individual. A powerful minority of the community, determined to maintain its position relative to the majority, assures the world that there is no alternative between the pyramid of power based on toil of ever-increasing monotony, and some form of famine and disaster; while a growing and ever more dissatisfied majority strives to throw off the hypnotic influence of training and to grapple with the fallacy which it feels must exist somewhere.

   As we ‘grapple with the fallacy’ we must keep in mind that it is largely the ‘hypnotic influence of training’ that we struggle against. We must allow ourselves the mind space to configure the pieces of the puzzle in ways our programmed ideas would not previously allow. We must allow space for something new. Social Credit reveals the order behind the chaos and clears the way to a healthier society.

 

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
485 Hits
0 Comments

The Morality of Work

   The issue of work is always a sticking point with people trying to comprehend the Social Credit position. When it’s all boiled down all we are saying is that when it comes to work people should be allowed to exercise the choice that progress would undoubtedly make possible if it weren’t for a financial setup that prohibits it.


   We take a neutral positon on work in that we believe there is good and bad work. If you’re a bulldozer driver chain clearing rainforest we would all be better off if you could stay home and paint pictures, compose music, glug beer or do nothing at all. It is difficult to argue against the statement that there is a hell of a lot of work that shouldn’t be done but those who do bad work will fight bitterly to continue to do it for the sake of the income it provides. As Oliver Heydorn wrote ‘there is nothing irreducibly positive about paid work.’

   With respect to the non-economic advantages of work; avoiding depression, status and social connections, these things can be obtained in other spheres outside the economy. I agree that being a useful person is an edifying condition. But if in a Social Credit society somebody felt depressed or isolated they would be free to work if they thought that the best way to deal with their malaise. There are plenty of jobs to do. Actually, it is fair to say that is it largely financial arrangements that make us so time poor resulting in much necessary work remaining undone. Social Crediters don’t propose stopping anyone from working, but we do object to an organisation like the Reserve Bank of Australia manipulating the money system in pursuit of a policy of full employment which they are bound to fail at in increasingly spectacular fashion. An objective, I should add, that comes before ‘the economic prosperity and welfare of the people of Australia.’ Check it out for yourself at their website http://www.rba.gov.au/about-rba/our-role.html.

   Despite a persistent call for work if we are honest it is actually money people want, not work. If you asked people whether they would prefer five hundred a week gratis or a job that paid five hundred a week I am confident in the prediction that the majority would choose the former. The point is that people don’t involve themselves in work in the first place to feel good. People work because they consider it the best way to get for themselves the physical necessities for living and then, if they’re lucky, some luxuries. The startling contradiction that these things are getting easier and cheaper to produce and the average person is having to work harder and longer to secure them is an indictment on an economic system that continues to paternalistically maintain as a priority the insistence on work as a moral principle.

   Present financial arrangements ensure we are a long way off being serious about a ‘just’ economy. There exists very real, degrading poverty and insecurity amidst the plenty of the industrialised nations and it is the intention of Social Credit to deal with it directly. I think it is an egregious diversion when leadership and the media moralise about employment instead of addressing the suffering of people.

   Morality aside the failure to distribute the product of the machine is having catastrophic effects and it is this destructive disorganisation that Social Crediters object to first. Quigley reports that in 1830 United States industry expended six million BTU per capita. A hundred years later it was 245 million BTU. Lord knows what it is today. Of course the increase is due to the utilisation of inanimate sources of energy and the result is a lot of stuff for sale and an edging out of labour as a factor in production. Far from abating, this trend has accelerated.

   I have recently read Veroufakis’ book The Global Minotaur and he makes some interesting points relevant to this discussion. At the end of the Second World War the United States pursued what he describes as The Global Plan. Its twin pillars were the economic restoration of Germany and Japan through means of massive finance and industrial assistance. The planners did not decide on this course out of the goodness of their hearts. Veroufakis says they did this in order to build in what he calls a Global Surplus Recycling Mechanism (GSRM). The realisation after the war was that there could never be enough demand generated in the United States to consume America's post-war industrial output. The solution was to build Germany and Japan as a marketplace for the output of American heavy industry. Additionally, the farsighted (or short-sighted) planners understood that to maintain this GSRM Japan and Germany would require similar zones in which to sell their product once they were up and running.

   If Veroufakis is right, and it stands to reason, the economic design for the post war world came out of the disequilibrium unavoidable in industrial economies that create money like we do. As I said the US didn’t do this out of sympathy for their recent enemies. They did it because they couldn’t imagine a system that would allow the Americans an extra day off and be paid for it. They couldn’t see how they could at the same time increase effective demand (get people incomes) and not do work.  Or, perhaps more precisely, they couldn’t imagine the banks allowing them to make credit that wasn’t attached to debt and therefore didn’t require an ongoing obligation to make things.

   The truth is that we can’t keep running industry at full tilt and avoid catastrophe, both social and environmental. Douglas said ‘if you put all the men to work on all the machines you get a surplus that only the organised destruction of war can deal with.’ Furthermore, the mechanical and polluting power of industry to do damage to the natural world makes it vital that we only use it carefully. Seriously, we are at the point when knocking off early is becoming a matter of survival of the species.

   In his essay In Praise of Idleness Bertrand Russel once wrote ‘the morality of work is the morality of slaves and the modern world has no need of slavery.’ Just think about it.

 

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
521 Hits
0 Comments

To Distribute or Redistribute

   There is a debate going on beneath the nonsense of mainstream economic discussion. The contenders are agreed on one important point; that a better distribution of wealth is the solution to our economic woes and the road to a more functional society. As Martin Luther King said ‘it is now incontestable that the wealth and resources of the United States make the elimination of poverty absolutely practical.’ This is true throughout the industrial world and could be true everywhere.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
1
613 Hits
0 Comments

The Honourables

   Any Social Crediter who knows his stuff will be able to tell you that while the plan for Social Credit is difficult to get across this is not the real problem. We can describe how the thing would come together to anyone with an attention span more than 15 minutes and a will to know. It seems that the real problem lies in convincing people that human nature could handle it without rending society limb from limb.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
637 Hits
0 Comments

The Message from Britain

   It would be remiss of me to let the vote of the British people to leave the EU go without mention.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
675 Hits
0 Comments

Our Broken Money Instrument

   Clearly the satisfaction of citizens’ material needs is not the objective of the present economic order. Australians will be painfully aware that the purpose of economics is ‘jobs and growth’ or, in other words, compounding economic activity.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
3
734 Hits
2 Comments

Australia's Last Fridge

    With the closure of the Electrolux factory in Orange this country has surrendered for the time being her will to make fridges.  The usual lament is heard; unemployment, the end of an era, and the standard reason trotted out about which nothing can be done; Australia cannot be competitive when it comes to manufacturing.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
1
721 Hits
0 Comments

A Brief Account of the Great Depression by C.H. Douglas

The following account of The Great Depression appears on page 25 of Douglas’ Brief for the Prosecution first published in 1945. It speaks for itself.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
961 Hits
0 Comments

Zellaby's Problem

    The scientific approach to the problem of the supply of material requirements is probably the most remarkable feature of modern society. The success of science in disclosing the relationship between matter and energy, and the practical application of this knowledge, comes with responsibilities unattended up to this time.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
880 Hits
0 Comments

The Freedom of Association

 The Social Credit discussion tends to be dominated by the technical economic considerations. In the back and forth about how the direction of the system can be changed to deliver sufficient purchasing power to individuals the philosophical underpinnings of Social Credit, why the system ought to be changed, can be eclipsed.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1014 Hits
0 Comments

A Fresh Approach to Banking

 I don’t know about you but our economic problems have kept me awake at night. In the small hours I lie there turning over the dilemma finding the solution only to find I’ve created another impossible tangle. The other night the solution came to me and I want to test it in this public space.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1328 Hits
0 Comments

The Glitch

     It is possible that Social Crediters come across as a one track record. The track is called ‘the gap’. I suspect that word is something like a trigger that launches the social crediter into as good an explanation as he is capable of the fault with the financial system; a trigger to which I am not immune. Excuse me.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1217 Hits
0 Comments

The Name of the Game

     Douglas claimed the purpose of Social Credit is to ‘release reality’ with respect to human activity, which means releasing people from artificial constraints. I suspect it was a frustration to him that people became increasingly preoccupied with the money question which was a limited policy based on a much more inspiring, subversive philosophy of real liberty and personal responsibility.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
932 Hits
0 Comments

Winston's Wisdom

This passage dealing with the reparation arrangements made following the First War appears on page 8 of the first volume of Churchill’s  The Second World War:

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
1
1363 Hits
0 Comments

The Future of Work - A Suggestion

 From time to time my mind turns to a difficult idea.  A.R. Orage called it The Fear of Leisure. In a speech by that name Orage said of the prospect of an increasingly leisured society, ‘Douglas can prove that it is possible; you have to make it desirable.1

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1252 Hits
0 Comments

Growth or Sanity

    Economists and politicians are pretty clear about their intentions for the economies they claim to run; growth.  Growth, in economic terms, means increasing production and consumption of goods and services. In other words, the policy of growth has the objective of always exceeding economic maximums. It is the economic policy equivalent of a rampaging snowball.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
987 Hits
0 Comments

The Shaking Off of Burdens; A Greek Triumph

    Seeing that Greece is the only thing people are talking about I give you the following tidy description of the rise and fall of the monopoly of credit in the same place at a different time. It is taken directly from Aubrey de Sélincourt’s The World of Herodotus. 

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1434 Hits
0 Comments

Social Credit Taking Out the Rubbish

     Once we have agreed that giving people money in line with Social Credit technique is possible without bringing down upon us financial ruin, we must deal with the idea that if you paid people for doing nothing, they wouldn’t do anything. That many subscribe to this obviously false notion indicates the success of financial propaganda. It is, however, useful to point out that this broadly held idea is suggestive of the crucial role that finance plays in society. That is, we believe it a way of getting people to do things they wouldn’t do for any other reason. In other words, it is government.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
Recent comment in this post
Administrator
Fantastic blog Will, well put.
Sunday, 28 June 2015 14:40
1106 Hits
1 Comment

Confessions of Australia's Central Bankers

    From time to time the leading salaried economists of the debt-money system go a long way in exposing the dysfunction of conventional financing for us, but it is probably the expectation that few who are not completely indoctrinated by the orthodox view will analyse what is being said in a critical light. Some interesting discussion was had at the 2015 Standing Committee on Economics in Hurstville with the purpose of inquiring into the Reserve Bank’s Annual Report of 2014.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
0
1223 Hits
0 Comments

Debt and Distortion

    I would like to expand at a more fundamental level on how the debt-money system distorts reality.

Continue reading
Rate this blog entry:
2
1122 Hits
0 Comments