Systems that aim to organise people can be placed into one of two groups; systems that limit peoples' freedoms and those that increase them. The latter philosophy is the foundation of the Social Credit movement conceived by the Anglo-Scottish Engineer Major Clifford Hugh Douglas.

     It was the assertion of Douglas that as far as natural law and technology would allow, systems should free people to choose what they do with their time, and this forms the objective of the Social Credit proposals for the reorganisation of finance and economics.

     It is the objective of the organisation of finance, economics and industry at this time to limit people’s freedoms to an ever-greater degree. This is confirmed by an analysis of the history of debt-finance, taxation, attitudes to employment, war and war spending, internationalism and environmental mutilation. The general trend toward the centralisation of power everywhere is systematically depriving individuals of power and, therefore, meaningful responsibility over their own lives. This trend runs contrary to the Social Credit tenet that systems are made for men and not men for systems.

     Those first reading Douglas and coming to understand Social Credit will be surprised at his conclusions and proposals for rectification. Please persist. It is the belief of large numbers of people that understanding in the fields of economics and finance falls outside their intellectual ability and so is the exclusive domain of the experts, that is, those paid by power.  The forces that control the lives of the people, must be the active interest of the people, if democracy is to be realised. It is the purpose of mainstream sources of information, including  media and education, to obscure the truth about the controlling forces in our lives and so leave people confused and apathetic.

     The interests of power over people are challenged in the Social Credit plan. Government and finance must be bent to the realities of our world for the promotion of freedom and the well-being of people which is inseparable from the responsible care of our natural world.

     Douglas’ proposals for a reorganisation of the monetary system, essentially ‘that the monetary system be made to reflect facts’ formed a major part of the discussion up to the Second World War. Since then they have been actively suppressed or, more significantly, ignored by a public decreasingly able or willing to study the problem for themselves, happy to believe what they are told.

    The Social Credit observations and recommendations for monetary reform derive from a broader philosophy articulated by Douglas and believed and developed by Social Crediters. This philosophy is an elaboration of Christ’s message that the ‘Sabbath was made for man,’ or that systems and rules are the servants rather than the masters of individuals. The maintenance of systems at the expense of individuals’ freedom is so commonplace that few of us even recognise the extent of their impositions and influence in our lives. The legitimacy of these systems requires challenging, the philosophy and resultant policy of Social Credit is that challenge.

     This website contains the invaluable and wonderfully concise writings of C.H. Douglas, a thinker before his time, whose ideas are as relevant today as they were when he first wrote them down. It is part of a global movement for the reestablishment of a sign post we will ignore at our peril.

     It is the hope of every Social Crediter that Douglas’ message would once again enliven in thinking people everywhere the desire for truth and the pursuit of real solutions to our problems.